SATIPATTHANA SUTTA (According to the Majjhima Nikaya)

 

Thus, I have heard. On one occasion, the Blessed One was living in the Kuru country at a town of the Kurus named Kammasadhamma. There He addressed the Bhikkhus thus: “Bhikkhus.” “Venerable sir,” they replied. The Blessed One said:

 

Bhikkhus, this is the direct path for the purification of beings, for surmounting (overcoming) sorrow and lamentation, for the disappearance of pain and grief, for the attainment of the true Way, for the realization of Nibbana, namely, the four foundations of mindfulness.

 

What are the four? Here, Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, having put away covetousness (envy) and grief for the world. He abides contemplating feelings as feelings, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, having put away covetousness and grief for the world. He abides contemplating mind as mind, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, having put away covetousness (envy) and grief for the world. He abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, having put away covetousness (envy) and grief for the world.

 

CONTEMPLATION OF THE BODY

 

a) Mindfulness of Breathing:

 

And now, Bhikkhus, does a Bhikkhu abide contemplating the body as a body? Here a Bhikkhu, gone to the forest or to the root of a tree or to an empty hut, sit down; having folded his legs crosswise, set his body erect, and established mindfulness in front of him, ever mindful he breathes in, mindful he breathes out. Breathing in long, he understands: “I breathe in long;” or breathing out long, he understands: “I breathe out long.” Breathing in short, he understands: “I breathe in short;” or breathing out short, he understands: “I breathe out short.” He trains thus: “I shall breathe in experiencing the whole body of breath;” he trains thus: “I shall breathe out experiencing the whole body of breath.” He trains thus: “I shall breathe in tranquilizing the bodily formation;” he trains thus: “I shall breathe out tranquilizing the bodily formation.” Just as a skilled turner or his apprentice, when making a long turn, understands: “I make a long turn;” or when making a short turn, understands: “I make a short turn;” so too, breathing in long, a Bhikkhu understands: “I breathe in long,” he trains thus: “I shall breathe out tranquilizing the bodily formation.”

 

In this way, he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, or he abides contemplating the body as a body externally , or he abides contemplating the body as a body both internally and externally. Or else, he abides contemplating in the body its arising factors, ot he abides contemplating in the body its vanishing factors, or he abides contemplating in the body both its arising and vanishing factors. Or else mindfulness that ‘there is a body’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And, he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 

b) The Four Postures:

 

Again, Bhikkhus, when walking, a Bhikkhu understands: “I am walking;” when standing, he understands: “I am standing;” when sitting, he understands: “I am sitting;” when lying down, he understands: “I am lying down;” or he understands accordingly however his body is disposed.

 

In this way, he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, externally, and both internally and externally. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 

c) Full Awareness:

 

Again, Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu is one who acts in full awareness when going forward and returning; who acts in full awareness when looking ahead and looking away; who acts in full awareness when flexing and extending his limbs; who acts in full awareness when wearing his robes and carrying his outer robe and bowl; who acts in full awareness when eating , drinking, consuming food and tasting; who acts in full awareness when walking, standing, siting, falling asleep, waking up, talking and keeping silent.

 

In this way, he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, externally, and both internally and externally. And, he abides independent, not clinging to anything in ttheworld. That too is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 

d) Foulness of the Body Parts:

 

Again, Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu reviews this same body up from the soles of the feet and down from the top of the hair, bounded by skin, as full of many kinds of impurity thus: “In this body there are head-hairs, body-hairs, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, sinews, bones, bone-marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, diaphragm, spleen, lungs, large intestines, small intestines, contents of the stomach, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, spittle, snot, oil of the joints, and urine.” Just as though there were a bag with an opening at both ends full of many sorts of grain, such as hil rice, red rice, beans, peas, millet, and white rice, and a man with good eyes were to open it and review it thus: “This is hill rice, this is red rice, these are beans, these are peas, this is millet, this is white rice;” so too, a Bhikkhu reviews this same body... as full of many kinds of impurity thus: “In this body there are head-hairs and urine.”

 

In this way he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, externally, and both internaly and externally... And, he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body—See # 5.

 

e) Elements of the Body:

 

Again, Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu reviews this same body, however it is placed, however disposed, as consisting of elements thus: “In this body there are the earth element, the water element, the fire element, and the air element.” Just as though a skilled butcher or his apprentice had killed a cow and was seated at the crossroads with it cut up into pieces; so too, a Bhikkhu reviews this same body... as consisting of elements thus: “In this body there are the earth element, the water element, the fire element and the air element.”

 

In this way, he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, externally, and both internally and externally... And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 

f-n) The Nine Charnel Ground Contemplations:

 

Again, Bhikkhus, as though he were to see a corpse thrown aside in a charnel ground, one, two, or three days dead, bloated, livid, and oozing matter, a Bhikkhu compares this same body with it thus: “This body too is of the same nature, it will be like that, it is not exempt from that fate.”

 

In this way, he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, externally, and both internaly and externally. And, he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 

Again, as though he were to see a corpse thrown aside in a charnel ground, being devoured by crows, hawks, vultures, dogs, jackals, or various kinds of worms, a Bhikkhu compares this same body with it thus: “This body too is of the same nature, it will be like that, it is not exempt from that fate.”

 

That too is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 

Again, as though he were to see a corpse thrown aside in a charnel ground, a skeleton with flesh and blood, held together with sinews... a fleshless skeleton smeared with blood, held together with sinews... a skeleton without flesh and blood, held together with sinews.. disconnected bones scattered in all directions, here a hand-bone, there a foot-bone, here a shin-bone, there a thigh-bone, here a hip-bone, there a back-bone, here a rib-bone, there a breast-bone, here an arm-bone, there a shoulder-bone, here a neck-bone, there a jaw-bone, here a tooth, there the skull, a Bhikkhu compares this same body with it thus: “This body too is of the same nature, it will be like that, it is not exempt from that fate.”

 

That too is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 

Again, Bhikkhus, as though he were to see a corpse thrown aside in a charnel ground, bones bleached white, the color of shells; bones heaped up, more than a year old; bones rotted and crumbled to dust, a Bhikkhu compares this same body with it thus: “This body too is of the same nature, it will be like that, it is not exempt from that fate.”

 

In this way he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, or he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, or he abides contemplating the body as a body externally, or he abides contemplating the body as a body both internally and externally. Or else he abides contemplating in the body its arising factors, or he abides contemplating in the body its vanishing factors, or he abides contemplating in the body both its arising and vanishing factors. Or else mindfulness that ‘there is a body’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 

 

CONTEMPLATION OF FEELING

 

And how, Bhikkhus, does a Bhikkhu abide contemplating feelings as feelings? Here, when feeling a pleasant feeling, a Bhikkhu understands: “I feel a pleasant feeling;” when feeling a painful feeling, he understands: “I feel a painful feling;” when feeling a neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling, he understands: “I feel a neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling.” When feeling a worldly pleasant feeling, he understands: “I feel a worldly pleasant feling;” when feeling an unworldly pleasant feling, he understands: “I feel an unworldly pleasant feeling;” when feeling a worldly painful feeling, he understands: “I feel a worldly painful feeling;” when feeling an unworldly painful feeling, he understands: “I feel an unworldly painful feeling;” when feeling a worldly neither-painful-nor pleasant feeling, he understands: “I feel a worldly neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling;” when feeling an unworldly neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling, he understands: “I feel an unworldly neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling.”

 

In this way he abides contemplating feelings as feelings internally, or he abides contemplating feelings as feelings externally, or he abides contemplating feelings as feelings both internally and externally. Or else he abides contemplating in feelings their arising factors, or he abides contemplating in feelings their vanishing factors, or he abides contemplating in feelings both their arising and vanishing factors. Or else, mindfulness that ‘there is feeling’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And, he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating feelings as feelings.

 

CONTEMPLATION OF MIND

 

An how, Bhikkhus, doeas a Bhikhu abide contemplating mind as mind? Here a Bhikhu understands mind affected by lust as mind affected by lust, and mind unaffected by lust as mind unaffected by lust. He understands mind affected by hate as mind affected by hate, and mind unaffected by hate as mind unaffected by hate. He understands mind affected by delusion as mind affected by delusion, and mind unaffected by delusion as mind unaffected by delusion. He understands contracted mind as contracted mind, and distracted mind as distracted mind. He understands exalted mind as exalted mind, and unexalted mind as unexalted mind. He understands surpassed mind as surpassed mind, and unsurpassed mind as unsurpassed mind. He understands concentrated mind as concentrated mind, and unconcentrated mind as unconcentrated mind. He understands liberated mind as liberated mind, and unliberated mind as unliberated mind.

 

In this way he abides contemplating mind as mind internally, or he abides contemplating mind as mind externally, or he abides contemplating mind as mind both internally and externally. Or else, he abides contemplating in mind its arising factors, or he abides contemplating in mind its vanishing factors, or he abides contemplating in mind both its arising and vanishing factors. Or else mindfulness that ‘there is mind’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating mind as mind.

 

CONTEMPLATION OF MIND-OBJECTS

 

(A) The Five Hindrance: An how, Bhikkhus, does a Bhikkhu abide contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects? Here a Bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the five hindrances. And how does a Bhikkhu abide contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the five hindrances?

 

1) Here, there being sensual desire in him, a Bhikkhu understands: “There is sensual desire in me;” or there being no sensual desire in him, he understands: “There is no sensual desire in me;” and he also understands how there comes to be the arising of unarisen sensual desire, and how there comes to be the abandoning of arisen sensual desire, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of abandoned sensual desire.

 

2) There being ill-will in him, a Bhikkhu understands: “There is ill-will in me;” or there being no ill-will in him, he understands: “There is no ill-will in me;” and he also understands how there comes to be the arising of unarisen ill-will, and how there comes to be the abandoning of arisen ill-will, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of abandoned ill-will.

 

3) There being sloth and torpor in him, a Bhikkhu understands: “There are sloth and torpor in me;” or there being no sloth and torpor in him, he understands: “There are no sloth and torpor in me;” and he also understands how there comes to be the arising of unarisen sloth and torpor, and how there comes to be the abandoning of arisen sloth and torpor, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of abandoned sloth and torpor.

 

4) There being restlessness and remorse in him, a Bhikkhu understands: “There are restlessness and remorse in me;” or there being no restlessness and remorse in him, he understands: “There are no restlessness and remorse in me;” and he also understands how there comes to be the arising of unarisen restlessness and remorse, and how there comes to be the abandoning of arisen restlessness and remorse, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of abandoned restlessness and remorse.

 

5) There being doubt in him, a Bhikkhu understands: “There is doubt in me;” or there being no doubt in him, he understands: “There is no doubt in me;” and he also understands how there comes to be the arising of unarisen doubt, and how there comes to be the abandoning of arisen doubt, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of abandoned doubt.

 

In this way he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects internally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects externally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects both internally and externally. Or else he abides contemplating in mind-objects their arising factors, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects their vanishing factors, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects both their arising and vanishing factors. Or else mindfulness that ‘there are mind-objects’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the five hindrances.

 

(B) Again, Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the five aggregates affected by clinging. And how does a Bhikkhu abide contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the five aggregates affected by clinging? Here a Bhikkhu understands:

 

1) Such is material form, such its origin, such its disappearance.

 

2) Such is feeling, such its origin, such its disappearance.

 

3) Such is perception, such its origin, such its disappearance.

 

4) Such are the formations, such their origin, such their disappearance.

 

5) Such is consciousness, such its origin, such its disappearance.

 

In this way, he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects internally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects externally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects both internally and externally. Or else he abides contemplating in mind-objects their arising factors, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects their vanishing factors, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects both their arising and vanishing factors. Or else mindfulness that ‘there are mind-objects’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the five aggregates.

 

(C) Again, Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the six internal and external bases. And how does a Bhikkhu abide contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the six internal and external bases?

 

1) Here a Bhikkhu understands the eye, he understands forms, and he understands the fetter that arises dependent on both; and he understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen fetter, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of the abandoning fetter.

 

2) Here a Bhikkhu understands the ear, he understands sounds, and he understands the fetter that arises dependent on both; and he understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen fetter, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of the abandoning fetter.

 

3) Here a Bhikkhu understands the nose, he understands odours, and he understands the fetter that arises dependent on both; and he understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen fetter, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of the abandoning fetter.

 

4) Here a Bhikkhu understands the tongue, he understands flavours, and he understands the fetter that arises dependent on both; and he understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen fetter, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of the abandoning fetter.

 

5) Here a Bhikkhu understands the body, he understands tangibles, and he understands the fetter that arises dependent on both; and he understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen fetter, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of the abandoning fetter.

 

6) Here a Bhikkhu understands the mind, he understands mind-objects, and he understands the fetter that arises dependent on both; and he understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen fetter, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of the abandoning fetter.

 

In this way he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects internally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects externally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects both internally and externally. Or else he abides contemplating in mind-objects their arising factors, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects their vanishing factors, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects both their arising and vanishing factors. Or else mindfulness that ‘there are mind-objects’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the six internal and external bases.

 

(D) Again, Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the seven enlightenment factors. And how does a Bhikkhu abide contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the seven enlightenment factors?

 

1) Here, there being the mindfulness enlightenment factor in him, a Bhikkhu understands: “There is the mindfulness enlightenment factor in me;” or there being no mindfulness enlightenment factor in him, he understands: “There is no mindfulness enlightenment factor In me; and also understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen mindfulness enlightenment factor, and how the arisen mindfulness enlightenment factor comes to fulfilment by development.”

 

2) Here, there being the investigation-of-states enlightenment factor in him, a Bhikkhu understands: “There is the investigation-of-states enlightenment factor in me;” or there being no investigation-of-states enlightenment factor in him, he understands: “There is no investigation-of-states enlightenment factor In me; and also understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen investigation-of-states enlightenment factor, and how the arisen investigation-of-states enlightenment factor comes to fulfilment by development.”

 

3) Here, there being the energy enlightenment factor in him, a Bhikkhu understands: “There is the energy enlightenment factor in me;” or there being no energy enlightenment factor in him, he understands: “There is no energy enlightenment factor in me;” and also understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen energy enlightenment factor, and how the arisen energy enlightenment factor comes to fulfilment by development.

 

4) Here, there being the rapture enlightenment factor in him, a Bhikkhu understands: “There is the rapture enlightenment factor in me;” or there being no rapture enlightenment factor in him, he understands: “There is no rapture enlightenment factor in me; and also understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen rapture enlightenment factor, and how the arisen rapture enlightenment factor comes to fulfillment by development.

 

5) Here, there being the tranquility enlightenment factor in him, a Bhikkhu understands: “There is the tranquility enlightenment factor in me;” or there being no tranquility enlightenment factor in him, he understands: “There is no tranquility enlightenment factor In me; and also understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen tranquility enlightenment factor, and how the arisen tranquility enlightenment factor comes to fulfillment by development.

 

6) Here, there being the concentration enlightenment factor in him, a Bhikkhu understands: “There is the concentration enlightenment factor in me;” or there being no concentration enlightenment factor in him, he understands: “There is no concentration enlightenment factor in me;” and also understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen concentration enlightenment factor, and how the arisen concentration enlightenment factor comes to fulfillment by development.

 

7) Here, there being the equanimity enlightenment factor in him, a Bhikkhu understands: “There is the equanimity enlightenment factor in me;” or there being no equanimity enlightenment factor in him, he understands: “There is no equamity enlightenment factor in me;” and also understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen equanimity enlightenment factor, and how the arisen equanimity enlightenment factor comes to fulfillment by development.

 

In this way he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects internally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects externally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects both internally and externally. Or else he abides contemplating in mind-objects their arising factors, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects their vanishing factors, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects both their arising and vanishing factors. Or else mindfulness that ‘there are mind-objects’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the seven enlightenment factors.

 

(E) Again, Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the Four Noble Truths. And how does a Bhikkhu abide contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the Four Noble Truths? Here a Bhikkhu understands as it actually is: “This is suffering;” he understands as it actually is: “This is the origin of suffering;” he understands as it actually is: “This is the cessation of suffering;” he understands as it actually is: “This is the way leading to the cessation of suffering.”

 

In this way he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects internally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects externally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects both internally and externally. Or else he abides contemplating in mind-objects their arising factors, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects their vanishing factors, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects both their arising and vanishing factors. Or else mindfulness that ‘there are mind-objects’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a Bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the Four Noble Truths.

 

(F) Bhikkhus, if anyone should develop these four foundations of mindfulness in such a way for seven years, one of two fruits could be expected for him: either final knowledge here and now, or if there is a trace of clinging left, non-return. Let alone seven years, Bhikkhus. If anyone should develop these four foundations of mindfulness in such a way for six years, for five years, for four years, for three years, for two years or for one year, one of two fruits could be expected for him: either final knowledge here and now, or if there is a trace of clinging left, non-return. Let alone one year, Bhikkhus. If anyone should develop these four foundations of mindfulness in such a way for seven months, for six months, for five months, for four months, for three months, for two months, for one monthor for half a month, one of two fruits could be expected for him: either final knowledge here and now, or if there is a trace of clinging left, non-return.

 

(G) Bhikkhus, this is the direct path for the purification of beings, for surmounting (overcoming) sorrow and lamentation, for the disappearance of pain and grief, for the attainment (achievement) of the true Way, for the realization of Nibbana, namely, the four foundations of mindfulness. That is what the Blessed One said. The Bhikkhus were satisfied and delighted in the Blessed One’s words.

 

 

There is another translation of this Sutra, please click on the link:  http://www.truehappiness.ws/52.html